Everything Else

DAY 18: What If You Could Control Your Dreams At Night? (30-Day Personal Blog Challenge)

Dreams

A couple days ago, I mentioned Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory (HSAM) in my blog post. HSAM is basically a condition where a person is able to effortlessly recall their life experiences in extreme detail, even from the time they were just a couple weeks old. What I find intriguing is that people who have this condition usually seem to have a greater ability to have lucid dreams, which is where a person is able to control their dreams. 

Dreams

Lucid dreaming is a real topic of interest for me. I used to have very vivid dreams and remembering up to 3 dreams a night when I woke in the morning was not uncommon for me. I say "used to" because something called motherhood has happened and now I am usually too exhausted to remember my dreams. I wonder whether like with HSAM, it there something about a person's brain that makes them have a greater ability to control their dreams? I may not have the right brain to be a musical genius or math whiz, but could my brain just be a little bit special in the dream department?

The potential of our brains is so fascinating to me. We sometimes dream about things that happened in our lives a long time ago that we have not actively thought about for a long time. I wonder whether all our brains are actually recording every single thing about our lives, but unlike people with HSAM, us normal people are just unable to access and retrieve all those memories? People with Alzheimer's disease sometimes revert to childhood behaviour such as speaking their first language that they had forgotten as an adult, so maybe it's really all buried deep inside there…and the only way us people without superior memory are able to access it is through changes in the brain that happens with disease…or through our dreams when we sleep?

Lucid dreaming or dream control is literally an art field. I didn't realise it was a "thing" until I was older and able to research it on the internet. Since I was very young, I have had many spontaneous lucid dreams, but never knew it was something that you could practice, intentionally induce, and excel in. Reading up about this field on made me feel so much less alone in this weird dream world. I realised there were many people out there like me and I could learn so much more about it. For a while, I did practice lucid dreaming. There is nothing weird or occult about it by the way. It just involves doing actions or asking yourself questions over and over again throughout the day when you are awake (e.g. put your hand on a wall to test if it's real) so that you end up doing it in your dreams. It was a very jubilant moment when I was able to induce lucidity in a particular recurring nightmare I had been having and reverse the nightmare and make myself wake up. Inducing lucid dreaming requires a lot of practice and discipline when you are awake though, so it was not something I was able to stick to for very long.

The frustrating thing I've had with the topic of lucid dreaming or even dreams in general is that I've only been able to find articles and books on it that is more geared towards the New Age stuff, whereas I am a Christian. It's funny that dreams are such a big part of how God speaks to us and feature so prominently in the bible, but somehow we are not discussing it much from a Christian perspective these days. Years ago I did find a Christian book on interpreting dreams though that was written by one of the pastors from my church. It was such a breath of fresh air to read a Christian perspective on dreams and to this day, it's still the only book of its kind I've read. If you are a Christian and interested in dreams and dream interpretation, I really recommend you read it. It's called In Your Dreams and is by Pastor Zoran Paunovich you can find it on his website HERE.

I personally believe lucid dreaming is something very normal and is not wrong from a Christian perspective. Sure it has the potential to be used for bad, but it's not any different from where your normal thoughts during the day are able to lead you. Like your thoughts and daydreams, you have to guard it. Something I've loved about lucid dreaming is just the ability to reverse the emotions connected to bad past experiences. I find in dreams, my thoughts are so much more organised and eloquent than they are in real life. I'm able to revisit situations or see people who are gone or who I don't see anymore, and say the right things to help me resolve situations and conflict, or just find the closure to move on in real life.

I loved the movie Inception because I found it had so many parallels with the world of lucid dreaming e.g. using a totem to test whether you were in reality or in a dream, preferring dreams to reality etc. I think it made explaining this side of me just so much easier to people like my husband. If there's anything you can learn from the movie though it's that dreams are great, but it's not something to get caught up in. The dream world can be fun, but it is never better than real life.

Well, it's getting late now and I better call it a night and get off to my interrupted, non-dreaming state of mum sleep. This topic is something I've been wanting to blog about for a while but never did because I did worry people might think it was a little strange. So in that sense this 30-day blogging challenge has been great for me as it's helped loosen up my writing inhibitions and stop censoring myself. I hope somewhere out there, someone finds this somewhat interesting….or maybe you have learned something new today! Good night, sweet dreams, folks! 😄

The 30-Day Personal Blog Challenge is a challenge to myself to consistently blog about my daily life for 30 days.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *